Jan 24 2017

My Awe-full Life

WY Yellowstone NP Grand Prismatic SpringI’ve recently come to the conclusion that I’ve had an awe-full life. Not awful, mind you, but awe-full or full or awe.  I was teaching a class a few days ago and I asked those in it if they could point to instances where they had experienced awe or wonder in nature.  Every single member could point to a time.  As we listed these out loud together I found myself coming up with example after example.  From my first glimpses of the Appalachian mountains and Atlantic ocean as a child until the present moment nature has continued to fill me with wonder and awe.  I can’t help but believe that is true for everyone.

God’s Creation is simply awesome! I’ve seen that awesomeness in giant trees and tiny flowers.  I’ve seen it in the Milky Way above and in marvelous creatures here below.  I’ve seen it in the heated desert and in the frozen tundra.  I’ve seen the awesomeness of nature in calving glaciers, steaming geysers and raging rivers.  I’ve seen it in mountains high and valleys low.  Near and far I’ve been blown away by the wonders and mysteries of Creation and led to moments of pure awe and worship.

WA Olympic NP Hoh RainforestThis awe-full life I’ve had comes as no surprise because the Bible teaches us that there is an awesome God behind all of this. Nature is awesome because it is a reflection of the awesomeness of God.  That awesomeness is found everywhere.  Isaiah 6:3 says “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory.” Because this is true there are awe-full moments waiting for us all of the time.  If we will but use the eyes and ears that we have been given we cannot escape experiencing God’s glory.

VA Atlantic Ocean sunriseThe apostle Paul believed that God’s awesomeness in Creation was so great and evident he declared “For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that men are without excuse.” (Romans 1:20)  Having seen what I’ve seen, it would be difficult for me to argue with Paul concerning this matter.

I believe that the Creator made the world awesome on purpose so that it would lead individuals like you and me to God. The marvels of nature are signposts directing us to God.  Today I am thankful for those signposts and for this awe-full life I’ve been given.  It has brought me much joy and brought me closer to the Maker of heaven and earth.

–Chuck

( I took the pictures shown above at Yellowstone NP, Olympic NP, and the Atlantic ocean.)


Nov 11 2016

Kindness and Awe

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“Be kind to one another…”  Ephesians 4:32

Last month Parade magazine published an article on awe. In this article the author, Paula Spencer Scott describes how the emotion of awe is getting more and more attention from researchers.  She said, “new studies show that it’s a dramatic feeling with the power to inspire, heal, change our thinking and bring people together.” Scott quotes Dacher Keltner’s, head of the University of California Berkeley’s Social Interaction Lab, definition of awe: “Awe is the feeling of being in the presence of something vast or beyond human scale, that transcends our current understanding of things.”

_ces3749It is likely that all of us have had experiences of awe. If you use Keltner’s definition of awe then most, if not all, of our religious experiences include an element of awe.  After all, when you encounter God you are encountering “something vast or beyond human scale,” something “that transcends our current understanding of things.” Many of our reactions of awe are triggered by nature.  It could be looking at the Milky Way on a clear night, watching a newborn fawn take its first steps, observing a sunrise, or standing before a booming waterfall.  God’s Creation offers us a multitude of opportunities to experience awe.

The current studies on awe are revealing some interesting results. One such result is that awe has a way of binding people together.  In a moment of awe we may very well come to realize that we are part of something much bigger than ourselves and begin to think more in terms of we than me.  Related to this, research indicates that awe makes us nicer.  In one study a group of participants were divided up.  One group was asked to spend a whole minute looking at an impressive stand of North America’s tallest eucalyptus trees while the other looked at a plain building.  It will come as no surprise that those who looked at the trees reported greater awe.  What is a bit surprising is something else that was included in this study.  When a tester “accidently” dropped pens in front of the subjects the awestruck ones helped pick up way more than the ones who had gazed at the building.  There is apparently some connection between awe and kindness.

f_dsc9914If this is indeed true, then we would all benefit by seeking to bring more awe and wonder into our lives. During the recent election season I saw several memes on Facebook with the caption “Make America Kind Again.”  I doubt that there is anyone who would deny that there is a shortage of kindness these days.  If awe can help make us kinder then we should take advantage of this connection and encourage others to do the same.  If we know, for example, that awe is invoked by being present in beautiful places then we should seek these out.  Awe may likewise be sought out by listening to inspiring music or reading good poetry.  It can often be found in personal and corporate expressions of worship.

I urge you to find ways to bring more awe into your life. Do this for your own soul’s sake and for the good of others.  Hopefully experiencing more awe will, in fact, lead us to think more in terms of “we” than “me” and make us kinder people too.  Hopefully it will draw us closer to God.

–Chuck

(I took the top image at Henderson Sloughs WMA, the middle image at Hoosier National Forest, and the bottom image in the eastern Sierra mountains.)


Apr 1 2015

Seeing With Wonder

_DSC9010Earlier today I took a longtime family friend out to see some of the bald eagles that we have nesting nearby.  It was the first time she had ever seen eagles close up in the wild and it was fun watching her excitement.  She told me that as the eagles would fly in and out of the nest her heart would start pounding.  When it came time to go I had trouble getting her to leave.  The bald eagles filled her with such wonder and awe she found it difficult to walk away from them.  I was touched by her enthusiasm but it also served as a reminder that because of my frequent sightings of bald eagles in the area I don’t get as excited about seeing them as I once did.  I certainly still enjoy seeing bald eagles but I will confess that because it has become routine I have lost a good bit of the awe and wonder my friend displayed this afternoon.

In her book, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Betty Smith writes “Look at everything always as though you were seeing it either for the first or last time: Thus is your time on earth filled with glory.”  I think that is wonderful advice.  It may be hard for some of us to regain the excitement of our first sighting of some bird, animal or flower but we should be able to discipline ourselves to look at things with the recognition that it might be our last time to do so.  I suspect we would pay far more attention than we normally do if we looked at things this way.

_DSC8958I am convinced that we need more wonder in our lives.  G. K. Chesterton once wrote, “We are perishing for want of wonder, not for want of wonders.”   There are certainly no lack of things found in God’s Creation that should cause us to experience wonder and awe.  Unfortunately, the problem is we fail to pay attention to these things and thus miss out on the wonder of it all.

_DSC8984One reason why I believe wonder is needed is that I see it as a prelude to worship.  When we experience wonder and awe we are on the verge of worship; we find ourselves very close to the God of wonders.  I have indicated numerous times on this site that I believe God has made the world not just to meet our physical needs but to point us to Him.  If we have eyes to see and ears to hear we will find much that will lead us to worship the Maker of heaven and earth and as Betty Smith indicates, it will also cause our time on earth to be “filled with glory.”

The next time you find yourself outdoors I encourage you to pray that God will help you look at everything as though you were seeing it either for the first or last time.  I have a feeling that it will truly make a difference.

–Chuck