Mar 29 2019

“A Caress of God”

This year for Lent I gave up desserts once again.  I don’t know why I keep doing that.  I also decided to add some extra reading into my Lenten journey.  One book I chose to read is Eager to Love: The Alternative Way of Francis of Assisi by Richard Rohr.  The other book is Pope Francis’ 2015 Encyclical on Climate Change and Inequality: On Care for Our Common Home.  I am enjoying Pope Francis’ optimistic outlook on things.  I must confess I’ve been pretty discouraged in recent months.  Perhaps that has something to do with living in America where environmental issues have largely been dismissed or ignored in recent years.  So it was good to hear Francis say “The Creator does not abandon us; he never forsakes his loving plan or repents of having created us.  Humanity still has the ability to work together in building our common home.”

In his book, Pope Francis offers a solid theological basis for Creation Care.  I want to share with you a few gems I have found thus far.  Francis writes, “Our insistence that each human being is an image of God should not make us overlook the fact that each creature has its own purpose.  None is superfluous.  The entire material universe speaks of God’s love, his boundless affection for us.  Soil, water, mountains: everything is, as it were, a caress of God.”  I love that phrase—“a caress of God.”  If we could view the world around us as a caress of God perhaps we would value and honor it more.

In another section Francis writes: “The universe as a whole, in all its manifold relationships, shows forth the inexhaustible riches of God. Saint Thomas Aquinas wisely noted that multiplicity and variety ‘come from the intention of the first agent’ who willed that ‘what was wanting to one in the representation of the divine goodness might be supplied by another,’ inasmuch as God’s goodness ‘could not be represented fittingly by any one creature.’  Hence we need to grasp the variety of things in their multiple relationships.  We understand better the importance and meaning of each creature if we contemplate it within the entirety of God’s plan.  As the Catechism teaches: ‘God wills the interdependence of creatures.  The sun and the moon, the cedar and the little flower, the eagle and the sparrow; the spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient.  Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.’”

Surely we would take better care of the earth if we realized that each part of it is a manifestation of God’s goodness and love.  Likewise, if we better understood the interdependence of life on earth it would lead us to be better stewards of Creation.  I’m not sure things will get much better unless we come to grasp the sacredness of the earth and our divine calling to tend to it.

–Chuck


Sep 4 2015

September 1–A Special Day

_DSC8374This past Tuesday, September 1, was a special day. By declaration of Pope Francis it was the first World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation. For several weeks the current pope has been making news with his strong affirmation that we have a divine obligation to care for God’s good earth. In an effort to highlight this obligation Francis has called for everyone to observe the World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation every September 1. It is hoped by doing so that light can be shed on the damage we humans have done to the earth and that it will open conversation among people about what we can do to help heal the world. I think this is a wonderful idea but I have to admit I didn’t see a lot of attention given to it this past Tuesday. Hopefully it is an idea that will catch on and grow in coming years.

_CES1075Two items that I did catch in the media pertaining to the World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation were prayers. The first one was penned by Pope Francis himself. Here is his prayer: “All-powerful God, you are present in the whole universe and in the smallest of your creatures.You embrace with your tenderness all that exists.Pour out upon us the power of your love, that we may protect life and beauty. Fill us with peace, that we may live as brothers and sisters, harming no one. O God of the poor, help us to rescue the abandoned and forgotten of this earth, so precious in your eyes.Bring healing to our lives, that we may protect the world and not prey on it, that we may sow beauty, not pollution and destruction. Touch the hearts of those who look only for gain at the expense of the poor and the earth.Teach us to discover the worth of each thing, to be filled with awe and contemplation, to recognize that we are profoundly united with every creature as we journey towards your infinite light. We thank you for being with us each day. Encourage us, we pray, in our struggle for justice, love and peace.”

_DSC7676The second prayer was one written by the esteemed biologist, Dr. Jane Goodall. On her Facebook page she shared the following prayer in honor of World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation: “We pray that we may at all times keep our minds open to new ideas and shun dogma; that we may grow in our understanding of the nature of all living beings and our connectedness with the natural world; that we may become ever more filled with generosity of spirit and true compassion and love for all life; that we may strive to heal the hurts that we have inflicted on nature and control our greed for material things, knowing that our actions are harming our natural world and the future of our children; that we may value each and every human being for who he is, for who she is, reaching to the spirit that is within, knowing the power of each individual to change the world”

_DSC7460I was touched by both prayers and add to them my own plea that God would help us to learn to appreciate and value the earth, never failing to remember that it holds many avenues through which we can come to know and worship our Maker. I pray that we humans will take seriously our divine calling to be stewards of Creation so that those who come after us will be able to enjoy not only its beauty and wonders but in order that they, too, might come to see and love God through Creation.

I learned long ago that there are times when we cannot simply pray and sit back waiting on God to act. In many instances we must put feet to our prayers and this is undoubtedly the case when we offer our prayers for the earth. I encourage you to pray for Creation and to put feet to your prayers. Pope Francis and Jane Goodall believe it will make a difference. So do I.

–Chuck

(The images shown above are ones I’ve taken not far from my home in Henderson, KY.)

 


Jun 19 2015

A Positive Outcome?

_DSC3043Pope Francis has certainly been getting a lot of attention the past few days.  His encyclical on climate change and the environment has been praised by some and scorned by others.  I have not read the entire encyclical but from the excerpts I’ve seen I am very impressed with what he has done here.  He has taken on both climate deniers and believers who are indifferent toward environmental issues indicating that we cannot afford to ignore what is happening to planet Earth.

Pope Francis notes that “the earth, our home, is beginning to look more and more like an immense pile of filth.”  Who can deny that we have dirtied the planet in more ways than one?  Water and air pollution remain prevalent problems in many places on the earth.  The garbage we produce each day is staggering and the disposal of it is a current problem but will become an even greater one in the future.

_DSC3047The papal encyclical addresses global warming, species extinction and, not surprisingly for this pope, the effect environmental issues have on the poor.  Pope Francis believes we have a moral and spiritual duty to do what we can to care for the earth.  He stresses that we owe it not just to God and to ourselves but to future generations as well.  One of the quotes from the encyclical that is getting a lot of attention says “Once we start to think about the kind of world we are leaving to future generations, we look at things differently; we realize that the world is a gift which we have freely received and must share with others.”

Pope Francis’ concern for the destruction of the earth is influenced by his belief that God is present in the Creation and makes Himself known through it.  He seems to have learned much from his namesake, St. Francis of Assisi, who praised God for “brother sun” and “sister moon.”  Pope Francis writes, “There is a mystical meaning to be found in a leaf, in a mountain trail, in a dewdrop, in a poor person’s face.”  He adds to this, “Soil, water, mountains: everything is, as it were, a caress of God.”

_DSC3317Sadly, a number of politicians and religious leaders feel Pope Francis should “stick to theology” and leave matters pertaining to the environment to scientists.  Ironically, the pope has a master’s degree in chemistry, but even if he didn’t the care of the earth is very much a part of theology.  I suspect the concern expressed by the pope’s critics has more to do with economic repercussions to his stance on the environment than anything else.  I fear many of these people bow to the gods of money and power rather than to the God of Creation whom the pope serves.

_DSC2487In his encyclical Pope Francis challenges us to “recover the values and the great goals swept away by our unrestrained delusions of grandeur.”  I hope and pray that we will all take this challenge seriously.  Elsewhere he writes “We believers cannot fail to ask God for a positive outcome.”  In these two passages I see the pope calling believers to both prayer and action.  Yes, we should all pray for “a positive outcome” to the crisis we find ourselves in but we must also follow God’s guidance and take the steps necessary to ensure that there will be a positive outcome both for us and for those who will follow in our steps.  This Protestant pastor hopes that Christians from all faith traditions will take seriously the message of Pope Francis.  I cannot help but believe that the future of the earth depends upon it.

–Chuck

(The pictures shown above are some I’ve taken recently at Henderson Sloughs Wildlife Management Area and Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge.)